the friends

One minute you’re getting your face bit off and the next minute you’re living in Hintzville.

One minute you’re basking in a glorious sunny, 61 degree day in February in Michigan and the next minute you’ve got mascara all down your tear-streaked face.

Because that gloriously warm February day reminds you of a similar unseasonably warm February day when you were basking in the excitement of a new relationship.

Which you loved.

And lost.

And still grieve.

And there’s really nothing you can say to grief while it’s barreling through like a freight train.

But what if you could stop it in its tracks?  What if, instead of looking back at last year’s happiness and grieving what you’ve lost, you could look forward to next year’s happiness in anticipation of what you’ll gain?

Because where you are is not where you’ll stay.

Dixie would tell you that if she could talk.  She would tell you that life can turn on a dime.  She would tell you that one day you’re living in a garage in Ohio, getting your face practically bit off by a mean dog and then, a couple of months later, you’re on a walk on a glorious sunny, 61 degree day in Michigan.

And you’re eating organic, grass-fed, home-cooked meals and getting belly rubs and snuggling on the sofa. And life is good.

Dixie and her sister were found on the side of the road in southern Ohio when they were 3 months old.  Life must have looked bleak for those two babies. But then they were taken into foster care and Dixie was immediately adopted by the foster mom’s mom – Betty.

Apparently Betty treated Dixie like a queen.  She even cooked for her.  They lived happily together for about 10 years.  And then Betty developed dementia and was moved into a nursing home.

And Dixie, near as I can figure, was bounced around from relative to relative and then eventually ended up back home at Betty’s house – where Betty’s grandson and his wife are now living.

But one of their dogs kept attacking Dixie – she has the scars under her right eye to prove it.  So she had to live outside and in the garage until she was finally surrendered back into foster care for her own safety.

For six weeks she lived in a foster home here in Michigan where, according to the foster mom, Dixie was heartbroken.

I wonder if, while being shuffled around this past year, she grieved the memory of her life with Betty. I wonder if she despaired ever curling up on a sofa or getting a belly rub or enjoying a home-cooked meal again.

But beagles are optimistic so I prefer to think that instead of grieving what was behind her she dreamed of the love that lay ahead.

And now here she is in Hintzville, curled up next to me on the sofa, her days filled with love and walks and really good food. She even has a gentle new brother, Max, who just stepped aside and made room for her when she started eating the food from his dish after polishing off her own. (Of course I intervened on his behalf and reminded her of her P’s and Q’s.)

Today I stopped to say thank you to God for providing for Dixie.  For Betty’s sake. For Dixie’s sake. For my sake. For Love’s sake.

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#AllthatglittersisGod.

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Jesus

Beyond Good

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My daughter was telling me why she didn’t like a certain Bible teacher, summing it up with this story:

“She and her husband went to an office Christmas party – of course she wouldn’t say whose – and after overhearing the ungodly conversations of the ungodly co-workers, they vowed never to go to an office Christmas party again.”

“I would have been way more inspired,” she continued, “if the woman had told a story about going to the party, learning something about the co-workers’ lives and entering in – perhaps visiting one in rehab or the hospital, meeting a need.”

In other words, a story about bringing Jesus into the midst of their ungodly lives rather than fleeing from them.

“Don’t be too quick to write that teacher off, she just isn’t there yet,”  I said.

“Not there yet? She’s in her fifties!  And she’s a Bible teacher.”

Lot’s of Bible teachers aren’t there yet.

Where is There?

It’s beyond the Ten Commandments.

The Ten Commandments are all about behavior. The first four dictate our behavior toward God and the following six dictate our behavior toward one another:  Don’t murder, don’t steal, don’t lie about one another, don’t commit adultery against one another, don’t covet one another’s stuff, don’t give your parents grief.

Lots of Bible teachers live in that list – mastering it, teaching it, warning against disobeying it.

And then Jesus comes along and says, “A new command I give you: Love one another.” John 13:34a NIV [italics added]

Beyond good behavior is love.

Beyond not harming anyone is actually loving them.

The Pharisees were all about perfecting their own behavior and judging the ungodliness of everyone else.  They piled on the rules, they raised the bars.

And to that Jesus said, “And you experts in the law, woe to you, because you load people down with burdens they can hardly carry, and you yourselves will not lift one finger to help them.”

Don’t flee from them, lift a finger to help them. Maybe even lay down your pristine, unpolluted life (James 1:27) to get to know them.

Jesus went on to say, “As I have loved you, so you must love one another.” John 13:34b [italics added again]

As I have loved you. That’s big love.

“Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.” John 15:13 NIV

And that brings me to Silence.

A few days later my daughter saw the movie Silence and our conversation continued.

In the movie, after much angst and suffering, a Jesuit priest apostatized – not to save himself, but to save the Japanese Christians among whom he was a missionary.

He went beyond good behavior to love.

He laid down his Jesuit reputation to save his friends.

And he stomped on Jesus.

Some might gasp.

And quote Jesus:

“But whoever disowns me before others, I will disown before my Father in heaven.” Matthew 10:33

And conclude that he is doomed.

But in the movie, after much prayer, Jesus told Father Rodrigues to step on His image.

And that might be the ultimate There:  To lay down one’s eternal life for one’s friends.

I don’t believe that Father Rodrigues lost his eternal life, but he was willing to take that gamble.

I read an article about the movie which shed a little light:

A Jesuit spiritual tradition may also be helpful here. In the Spiritual Exercises St. Ignatius speaks of three levels, or “degrees,” of humility. The first level is when one does nothing morally wrong. In other words, one leads a good life. The second level is when a person who, when presented with the choice of riches or poverty, honor or disgrace, is free of the need for either. In other words, the person is free to accept whatever God desires, not being “attached” to one state or the other.
The third level of humility, the highest, is when a person is able to choose something dishonorable because it brings him or her closer to Christ. “I desire to be regarded as a useless fool for Christ, who before me was regarded as such,” in the words of the Spiritual Exercises. A person accepts being misunderstood, perhaps by everyone, just as Christ was.
This is what Father Rodrigues chooses, confusing as it may be to Christian Europe, to his Jesuit superiors—and even to modern-day filmgoers.   – America, the Jesuit Review

Right now that Bible teacher is trying real hard not to do anything morally wrong and to keep herself from being polluted by the world.  Good for her. She’s setting a “good” example.

And some day she’ll risk her reputation among her fellow unpolluted Bible teachers to set an even better example – one that inspires.

She’ll get There. It’s the Holy Spirit’s job to get her There.

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life

Clean Water & Broken Cisterns

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Solomon told us to remember our Creator while we are young – before the days of trouble come.

“Remember Him,” he wrote, while you can still see and hear.

Remember Him while your spirit is still attached to your body,
while you can still offer up prayer
and your body can still hold the Holy Spirit.
Remember Him while you still have the strength to draw Living Water.
Remember Him before you are dust.

Of course, he put it poetically:

“Remember him—before the silver cord is severed,
and the golden bowl is broken;
before the pitcher is shattered at the spring,
and the wheel broken at the well,
and the dust returns to the ground it came from,
and the spirit returns to God who gave it.”  Ecclesiastes 12

Today I was reading John 14 and I understood a few of Jesus’ words in a new way.  Thanks to Solomon and Jeremiah.

“My people have committed two sins: They have forsaken me, the spring of living water, and have dug their own cisterns, broken cisterns that cannot hold water.” Jeremiah 2:13

Here’s what Jesus said that I think I finally get:

“Very truly I tell you, whoever believes in me will do the works I have been doing, and they will do even greater things than these, because I am going to the Father.”  John 14:12

What can be greater than raising Lazarus from the dead? Feeding multitudes with a few fish and loaves? Healing leprosy, blindness, crippling physical and mental diseases with just a touch or a word? Forgiving sins?

I can’t do any of those things.  Except forgive sins. I can forgive sins that are committed against me. But only if God works it out in me.

And that’s the point.

Jesus said that He only said what He heard the Father saying and He only did what he saw His Father doing.

So it’s not that I’ll do greater things than Jesus did, it’s that the things God does through me are much more impressive than the things He did through Jesus because Jesus was perfect and I am not.

I am a broken cistern, barely able to keep the Holy Spirit from leaking completely out. Actually, I’m more like a clogged pipe – full of debris that hinders the flow of the Spirit.

When the Father worked through Jesus He was working through the perfect human being. When He works through us He’s using damaged tools, dull blades, dim bulbs and clogged pipes.

And even so He is able to create masterpieces of love and good deeds.

Kinda’ makes me want to give Him ALL the glory.

#clean

 

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love, Michigan

Wes Leonard

Wes Leonard scored the final basket in the final game of the regular season and then he died.

The score was tied going into overtime. The Fennville Blackhawks had won 19 out of 19 games. A perfect season hung in the balance, and then Wes scored 4 points for the win.

That was in 2011.

This past Friday afternoon the hub and I drove to Hope College in Holland, Michigan to attend the 6th Annual Wes Leonard Heart Team Never Forgotten Game:  Fennville vs. Saugatuck.

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At halftime Wes’ former teammates lined up mid-court.

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And presented a portable AED machine to representatives from 20 High Schools.

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The hub, blurry in my haste to snap a pic before he sat down, was one of them.

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Before the game we were taught how to use the device and instructed in the importance of maintaining fresh batteries.  Wes’ school had a device the night he died but the battery was dead.

At the end of the game the fans from both schools – rivals – chanted Wes-ley Leo-nard, just as they have at the end of every game these past six years.

I love this family and this community – who have come together to get life saving information, legislation and devices into every Michigan school.

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Since Holland is about a 3 hour drive, we spent the night.

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In the morning, as we walked into town in search of the perfect cafe miel – and it was perfect – we came upon this sculpture.  Which is another reason I love this town.

I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic, for which it stands, one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

If you didn’t watch the video, scroll back up and watch it.  With a hanky.

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the friends

There is no remedy for love but to love more.

One of the good foster moms told me that the only way she could cope with the heartbreak of saying goodbye to a child – especially when the child was leaving her to return to a barely stable birth parent – was to quickly welcome another child into her home.

Yesterday my family received two cards in the mail.

One was a sympathy card from our vet and the other was from the Michigan Animal Adoption Network notifying us that our vet had made a donation in Bebe’s honor.

So this morning, of course, I googled the Michigan Animal Adoption Network and read all about fostering dogs.

And now I want to foster one.

Then I clicked on the adoption link and read the profiles of several beagles in foster homes near me who are awaiting permanent families.

And now I want to foster a dog AND adopt Dixie.

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This is Dixie.  We haven’t met yet but I think I love her.

I sent a text to both the hub and my daughter… Haven’t heard back from the hub.

The only thing that gives me pause is Maxy.  He might prefer to live out his elderly life in peace and quiet.

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This is how Maxy prefers to spend his days.

But he does still love his walks.  And a new friend might make him feel young again…

I’m thinking the Maxers and I could at least go visit Dixie, see how they get along.

And now I’m thinking that donation might have had a threefold purpose:

  1. to honor Bebe
  2. to provide needed funds to a good organization – specifically to provide comfort to suffering dogs through their Animal Care Network.
  3. and to perhaps make the hub and me aware of the organization; to spur us on toward love and good deeds.

There is no remedy for love but to love more. – Thoreau

I’ll keep you posted.

#exposure

 

 

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