life

Gloom & Raspberries


Could we foresee it, there are times when children might seem like innocent prisoners condemned not to death but to life and as yet all too unconscious of what their sentence means. Nevertheless, every man desires to reach old age… a state of life of which it may be said “it is bad today, and every day it will get worse, until the worst of all happens.” – Arthur Schopenhauer

I plucked that cheery quote from a book I’m reading. It is the longer version of a sentiment I saw emblazoned upon a black t-shirt, which was hanging in a store window on my college campus way back then: Life is hard and then you die.

The last part – “every day it will get worse, until the worst happens” – made me think of my poor Max.

It was horrible to lose Lucybee and Bebe to cancer when they were still in their prime but is also sad to watch your previously very active and athletic buddy boy deteriorate from old age. Physically and mentally.

My hope is always that my four legged friends will die old and full of years, that they will be well and happy when they go, all curled up in their favorite chair, the familiar sounds of their loving family life lulling them to their final sleep.

But I guess it doesn’t happen that way.

Just for you, just now, just to brighten this post up a bit,

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I went outside and plucked some raspberries.

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They are delicious.

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6 thoughts on “Gloom & Raspberries

  1. You know, ideas about life and death really impact our worldview. The debate on vaccines for instance, has a lot to do with the fear of death. People opposed to vaccines (or just opposed to the current schedule) have watched their children suffer a lower quality of life from vaccine side-affects. Pro-vaccine people say they’d rather live with a child with autism than to have them die. Those beliefs are shaped by what they have determined about life and death. Heavy stuff!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, and beliefs about vaccines are also shaped by whether or not you trust the medical profession.

      I may have told you this before, but my sister and I both developed a “mild” case of smallpox from our vaccine. As we laid in bed unable to lift our heads from our pillows, a neighbor came over with a newspaper in hand and said that smallpox vaccines were no longer going to be required. She read from an article that said smallpox had been eradicated from the U.S. and that more people were dying from the vaccine than from the disease. (not what our very sick 7 and 8 year old selves needed to hear).

      A few years ago a tetanus booster (improperly administered) wreaked all kinds of havoc on my nervous system.) None of the specialists to whom I was referred could tell me what is in a tetanus booster, how it works or even whether it uses a live culture.

      My conclusion: weigh the cost/benefit – what is the actual likelihood of contracting the disease; make sure the doc knows what he is injecting into your arm (and what to do if it goes horribly awry) BEFORE you let his assistant anywhere near you with that needle; keep in mind that medicine is no longer a benevolent art, it’s a big pharmaceutical business – with a big ol’ conflict of interest. (Not to sound cynical.)

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’m right there with ya! I believe in getting as educated as possible when it comes to medication, vaccines, diet, supplements, the whole nine. I’ve had major side affects and so has my kid so I approach things with caution.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I always hope my old dogs and cats will die peacefully in their sleep, but it never seems to happen that way for me and I’m forced with the dreaded euthanasia decision. And I still say it’s one of the hardest decisions we humans have to make.

    I’ve also seen a shirt that says: We are born naked, wet, and hungry. Then things get worse. LOL!

    Liked by 1 person

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